Hanta Virus – Russia

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From January to September, there have been 19 cases of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in the Leninogorsk region of Russia.

Many patients became infected in the forest and some at their own house. Rodents carry the disease and spread the virus to humans through infected air droplets.

Experts recommend measures aimed at exterminating rodents, general sanitary guidelines, and improved plumbing.

Photo: Rat – rodents are a natural reservoir of Hantavirus.

Exposure to Hantaviruses can cause a rare but often fatal disease called Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) or a hemorrhagic fever, which can progress rapidly into serious complications.

Humans are most often exposed by breathing in air particles contaminated by deer mouse saliva, urine, or feces containing infectious Hantaviruses.

Caution must be used when opening cabins, sheds or garages after a period of time. Floor surfaces may be contaminated and are best disinfected with a 10% bleach solution to avoid raising contaminated dust.

The natural reservoir of Hantavirus is rodents, although infected with the virus it does not cause disease in them. Humans may become infected with Hantaviruses through contact with rodent urine, saliva, or feces. Some strains cause potentially fatal diseases in humans, such as Hantavirus hemorrhagic fever or Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Human infections of Hantaviruses have almost entirely been linked to human contact with rodent excrement; however, in 2005 and 2019, human-to-human transmission of the Andes virus was reported in South America. Hantavirus infections have been reported from all continents except Australia.

Hantavirus is named for the Hantan River area in South Korea where an early outbreak was observed.

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